Chao Hotel Beijing / gmp Architects

© Christian Gahl

( c) Christian Gahl

Architects: gmp Inventor

Location: Workers’ Stadium E Rd, Chaoyang, Beijing, China

Architect In Commission: Meinhard von Gerkan, Stephan Schutz, Stephan Rewolle

Design Crew: Liu Xiao, Xiao Wenda, Yang Ying, Lin Da, Ding Qiao, Zhou Yihan

Project Management: Su Jun

Area: 31372.0 m2

Project Year: 2018

Photographs: Christian Gahl

Facade Consultant: SuP Ingenieure GmbH, Beijing

Interior Design: CITI( Beijing) Construction Co ., Ltd; gmp

Structural Design& Hvac: Beijing Institute of Architectural Design( Group) Co ., Ltd( BIAD)

Patient: Chao Hotel

© Christian Gahl

( c) Christian Gahl

Text description provided by the designers. The brand-new facade by von Gerkan, Marg and Spouse Architects( gmp) channels a lightness and a sculptural consequence to the renewed inn pillar, which can be seen from afar. Its angled vertical points and the rotate shut and glazed committees create a play of light and shadow. Horizontal ledges are put every 2 stories, thus creating a allay facade geometry with balanced proportions. In addition to the external envelope, gmp designed the multifunctional “Glasshouse” to compute a venue with a special atmosphere to the inn complex.

© Christian Gahl

( c) Christian Gahl

Masterplan

Masterplan

Courtesy of gmp

Courtesy of gmp

Since its modernization and reopening in 2016, the 80 -meter-high hotel tower is one of the popular destinations in the Sanlitun business quarter of Beijing. The former “Beijing City Hotel” was established in 1990 as China began to open up. The onetime look of the building and its scant relationship with the urban issues context were an expression of the results of Beijing’s fast urbanization process. The motif by gmp poses a peer and hitherto long-term functional hotel architecture that reestablishes the position of the tower in the urban context.

© Christian Gahl

( c) Christian Gahl

The three-dimensional zig-zag-like building envelope shows the triangular footprint of the 26 -story tower and reinforces the recognizability of the building. Curtain-wall elements in light-footed gray-headed glass-fiber concrete change with gray-tinted glass bodies and the angled grouping of these panels and aspects means that, depending on the considering inclination, the sides of the building appear to change between open and closed.

© Christian Gahl

( c) Christian Gahl

Slender horizontal steps made of glass-fiber concrete have been inserted every other story, thus creating a amicable rhythmic disagreement of the facade. The geometric organisation and the story-high glazing opens the formerly introverted building to the circumventing urban cavity and appoints a brand-new spatial aspect in the hotel rooms.

Standard Floorplan

Standard Floorplan

The materials and structure of the high-rise facade continue in the new lengthened admission expanse of the hotel. A colonnade on the west and south line-ups of the building consisting of ten-meter-high glass-fiber concrete ingredients visually defines the entering and screens the semi-public forecourt to the south of the hotel.

© Christian Gahl

( c) Christian Gahl

The vertical panels with triangular cross-sections are stood at different directions, which has the effect of navigating inn patrons intuitively from the noisy Workers’ Stadium North Road to the adjourned, formerly terribly concealed, hotel entry. Likewise, the venue modernise by gmp and be called “Glasshouse” shows the clear geometry of the facade designing. Subscribed by an arched organization, a double-skin ceiling with an external mantle of glazing and internal louvers admits daylight into the opening below, which has aptly been reputation “Glasshouse”.

© Christian Gahl

( c) Christian Gahl

The louvers run as solar screening inventions, lightening the natural flare, and as a means of attenuating music. The interplay of emblazons of the concrete archways and wooden louvers in combination with the play of light and shadow create a practically spiritual atmosphere in the seat below.

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Office Building Lyon Confluence Îlot A3 / Christian Kerez

© Maxime Delvaux

( c) Maxime Delvaux

Designers: Christian Kerez

Location: Lyon, France

Project Architect: Catherine Dumont d’Ayot

Project Team: Catherine Dumont d’Ayot, Werner Schuhrer, Federico Rossi, Francesca d’Apuzzo, Martin Kugelmeier, Lion Haag, Marina Montresor, Nathanael Weiss, Jonas Rauber, Lou Dumont d’Ayot, Ginevra Masiello, Hermes Killer, Francesca Gagliardi, David-Lloyd Ruggiero, Andreas Papadantonakis, Micheal Godden, Holger Harmeier, Michelle Nageli

Area: 6600.0 m2

Project Year: 2018

Photographs: Maxime Delvaux

Local Designers: AFAA, Lyon, Marc Favaro, Anne-Sophie Rigal, Margaux Agnes, Yoan Bonhomme

Project Management: MN2A, Paris, Pascale Wiscart

Structural Engineer: BATISERF ingenierie, Fontaine, Philippe Clement

Mechanical Engineer: Artelia Limonest, Franck Delavaloire

Building Physics Engineer: Etamine, Vaulx-en-Velin, Sebastien Randle

Building Work Operator: Arcoba, Limonest

Acoustics Consultant: Synacoustique, Bordeaux, Didier Blanchard

Landscape Architecture: Michel Desvigne Paysagiste, Paris

Developer: Icade Promotion – Territoire Sud Est

© Maxime Delvaux

( c) Maxime Delvaux

Text description provided by the architects. The position build is a generic space. It is characterized by a grid of tower and slabs to ensure total opennes. This organize is divested bare and grows the building of the building. The interior and exterior model a incessant whole.

© Maxime Delvaux

( c) Maxime Delvaux

Floor Plans

Floor Hope

© Maxime Delvaux

( c) Maxime Delvaux

It ensures the urban integration of the building in the particular context of the obstruction, both a reconverted industrial area and part of a thick-witted network of streets and boulevards.

© Maxime Delvaux

( c) Maxime Delvaux

The construction, heavy towards the grind and lighter towards the sky, reinterprets the classical tripartite composition- basi, gibe, and fund- of the 19 th-century builds along the Cours Charlemagne or Place Bellecour.

© Maxime Delvaux

( c) Maxime Delvaux

The first three different levels of the building have columns made use of embossed cement, those of the middle two grades are shaken like that of the slab and spandrels and the line of the last three floors are prefabricated with centrifuged fiber concrete.

© Maxime Delvaux

( c) Maxime Delvaux

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Aruá Building / FGMF Arquitetos

© Rafaela Netto

( c) Rafaela Netto

Inventors: FGMF Arquitetos

Location: R. Cajaiba, 335 – Vila Pompeia, Sao Paulo – SP, 01257 -0 40, Brazil

Columnists: Fernando Forte, Lourenco Gimenes, Rodrigo Marcondes Ferraz

Architect In Charge: Fernando Forte

Area: 3700.0 m2

Project Year: 2018

Photographs: Rafaela Netto

Coordinators: Ana Paula Barbosa, Sonia Gouveia

Traitors: Adriana Pastore, Alessandra Musto, Carolina Matsumoto, Caroline Endo, James Smaul, Juliana Fernandes, Juliana Nohara, Luciana Bacin, Rodrigo de Moura, Vera Silva, Wanessa Simoe

Interns: Carla Facchini, Fernanda Silva, Fernanda Verissimo, Gabriela Eberhardt, Nara Diniz, Otavio Araujo

Incorporating: Theme! Zarvos

Constructor: Lock Engenharia

Foundation And Structural Engineering: Monteiro Linardi Engenheiros Associados e MGA

Electrical And Plumbing Installation: Criarq Projetos e Gerenciamento, FEP

Landscaping: Rodrigo Oliveira

Lighting Design: Castilha Iluminacao

Heating: Jorge Chaguri

Project Management: Caique

© Rafaela Netto

( c) Rafaela Netto

Text description provided by the inventors. The Arua building was designed considering 4 different stymies joined by a common vertical flow. The work is similar to a jigsaw mystify made up of four constructs with different plans and elevations, is incorporated into one. The combining of these publications model an ascending spiral, as each blocking has a floor that is higher than the previous one. This crusade spurred the building’s refer, implying snail husk in Tupi.

© Rafaela Netto

( c) Rafaela Netto

Ground Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan

© Rafaela Netto

( c) Rafaela Netto

The strategy of each volume with a different template allowed a series of penthouses with verandas and gardens at these levels, like the yard of a room, differences between the usual access to the open locality alone through a second floor. Each impede receives an different finish, to accentuate the difference in the blueprint and occupation of each of the volumes that comprise the building.

© Rafaela Netto

( c) Rafaela Netto

Diagram

Diagram

© Rafaela Netto

( c) Rafaela Netto

The building includes many references to good Brazilian modern design. The entrance hall is entirely open underexposed concrete column; the landscape designs are quite humid; there is a large art board made of plaster tiles by artist Joao Nitsche; the openings in the accommodations have sliding screens, and the building is accessed through an exposed cement admission that distinguishes the transition between public and private, and also serves as a sidewalk bench.

© Rafaela Netto

( c) Rafaela Netto

The final architectural work of the project related the designers from the beginning, as the legislation related to the ratio between land area, framed province, profession desire, and template forced a decision somewhat robust and compact. To that dissolve, the purposes of applying loudnes change too allowed for a plastic approaching to the implementation of these publications, reinforced in the scrupulous facades and acces, particularly in the small magnitude, perfectly rowed with synthetic floors. The plastic upshot of the laid seeks to minimize the implications of the new construction, supporting a engage in dialogue with the city morphology of wall street, making this a friendlier structure to pedestrians and the city textile.

© Rafaela Netto

( c) Rafaela Netto

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Taipei Nanshan Plaza / Mitsubishi Jisho Sekkei

© Shinkenchiku-sha

( c) Shinkenchiku-sha

Architects: Mitsubishi Jisho Sekkei

Location: Xinyi District, Taipei City, Taiwan

Project Team: Tetsuya Okusa( Project Director ), Yasuhiro Sube( Project Architect ), Hiroshi Kawamura, Takaaki Fuji, Noboru Kawagishi, Shunichi Osaki

Project Year: 2018

Photographs: Shinkenchiku-sha, Hisao Suzuki, Nan Shan Life Insurance

Structural Engineer: Mitsubishi Jisho Sekkei Inc.+ Evergreen Consulting Engineering, Inc.

Mechanical Designer: Mitsubishi Jisho Sekkei Inc.+ GHIA Engineering Consultants Co ., Jiesheng HVAC ENGINEERING, YUAN DAH FIRE FIGHTING ENGINEERING CO.LTD, Ming Shuei Engineering

Lighting Design: CMA LIGHTING DESIGN

Construction Supervision: Archasia Design Group

Ffe Coordinator: Mitsubishi Jisho Sekkei Inc.

Art Coordination: Mitsubishi Jisho Sekkei Inc.

Project Management: Mitsubishi Jisho Sekkei Inc.

Total Floor Area: 192,891.35 m2

Site Area: 17,708 m2

Building Area: 10,271.41 m2

© Hisao Suzuki

( c) Hisao Suzuki

Text description provided by the inventors. The Xinyi district of Taipei, where the building website is set, is a cosmopolitan tourism place that symbols the city as a whole. Located on a new urban contrive drawn up including the government that is conducive to cityscape-conscious improvement, the neighborhood has grown into a business hub with a variety of amenities including store, artistries equipment, and international exhibit infinites. The construct stands on the former sand of a market hub contiguous to Taipei 101, the tallest building in Taiwan, on the south periphery of Xinyi. Mitsubishi Jisho Sekkei won a government-led growing competition to spouse on development projects with Nanshan Life Insurance, which has a fifty-year lease from national governments and planned to construct an office and high-end shopping complex to re-energize the district.

© Shinkenchiku-sha

( c) Shinkenchiku-sha

Floor Plan

Floor Plan

© Hisao Suzuki

( c) Hisao Suzuki

The first time our crew saw the site–a long, thin, piece of land appraising 100 rhythms north-to-south and 270 rhythms east-to-west–we discovered the acces the flow of people and energy from the patronize territory to the north dissolved there. In succession to entice visitors to the locate and create a lively atmosphere, we proposed a brand-new landmark tower to draw beings from a distance, paired with a human-scale platform to welcome them in. The suggestion was for the 272 -meter tower to model a aim with Taipei 101, creating a new skyline for the city while harmonizing with the existing neighborhood.

© Shinkenchiku-sha

( c) Shinkenchiku-sha

The tower is filled mainly by departments, with eateries boasting stunning ends on the three best floorings. The architectural design, inspired by the image of two hands joined in a prayer of thanks and peacefulnes, conveys the insurance company’s grateful toward its customers and passion for them to enjoy health and agreement. A low-rise “Retail Annex” and the “Cultural Entrance Annex, ” a multi-purpose ethnic dormitory, adjoin the pillar on either side, associating horizontally to the bustle of the smothering place.

© Hisao Suzuki

( c) Hisao Suzuki

The “Retail Annex” is comprised of three huge cubes offset in interspersing strata, like handwritings placed on top of each other. The entire facade is covered with an imaginative, three-dimensional cast-stainless-steel motif of plum flowers, “the member states national” bloom of Taiwan. The construct makes abundant utilize of other handmade decorative parts as well, which seek to cause its assessment of artistry. The “Cultural Entrance Annex” has a trussed eggshell whose sculptural form seems to invite people in with outstretched hands.

© Hisao Suzuki

( c) Hisao Suzuki

In the nights, Taiwan’s first rooftop rail glitters at the flower of the castle, while the embeds on the retail castle terraces blend in with the neighboring common, further enhancing the attractiveness of the building from afar. The contemporary building may present the misconception of having been created automatically by computers and machines, but in reality, human entrust come together at all the stages of blueprint and interpretation Taipei Nanshan Plaza amply shows the minds of the invention symbolized by human hands.

© Shinkenchiku-sha

( c) Shinkenchiku-sha

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Delfland Water Authority / Mecanoo

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Architects: Mecanoo

Location: Delft, The Netherlands

Area: 8800.0 m2

Project Year: 2017

The projects: Heuvel-op, Uitgeest

Architecture, Interior And Landscape: Mecanoo architecten, Delft

Structural Engineer: Zonneveld, Rotterdam

M+ E Engineer: Nelissen, Eindhoven

Acoustic, Building Physic And Fire Safety Consultant: Peutz, Zoetermeer

Cost Consultant: Basalt bouwadvies bv, Nieuwegein

Consultant: Draaijer& Partners, Utrecht

Main Contractor: Koninklijke Woudenberg, Ameide

Installations: Unica bv, Rotterdam

Client: Hoogheemraadschap van Delfland, Delft

Artist: SILO, Den Haag

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Text description provided by the inventors. The Delfland Water Authority are presented in a historical be built upon the Oude Delft: the Gemeenlandshuis. The monumental division was built in 1505 as a house for Jan de Huyter. The sandstone facade was unique for that time and it was one of the few structures to endure the 1536 metropolitan flame. More than 100 years later, the members of this house came into the hands of the Delfland Water Authority.

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

A brand-new housingOver season the Water Authority expanded to include several adjacent stupendous buildings, and in 1975 a brand-new building on the Phoenixstraat was supplemented. In 2014, the Water Authority made a decision to alter its residence policy. The most important exercise was to perform what was once a fragmentary complex into a cohesive entirety. The intention was to alter it into a pleasant, flexible working environment that manifests both the standard of modern experience and the identity of the Water Authority while maintaining the special characteristics of the stupendous elements.

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Ground Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan

ConnectivityMecanoo espoused the theme ‘View of Delft’ as the starting point for the specific characteristics. First, all parts of the building were analyzed: what are the disturbing qualities and what are the defects? By drawing openings at strategic sites, a clearly defined road has been created. The route links special interior objects and see-through in the building, but also connects the inside and the outside with opinions to the characteristic turret, the smothering monumental houses, the Old Church, and the courtyard. This helps visitors to orient themselves. Along part of the road, an exhibition was arranged in the form of an ‘honorary gallery’ with objectives and gifts received by the Water Authority during the hundreds of years of its existence.

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

EncountersThe historic areas have been reinstated and the technical installings have been( unnoticeably) revived. Where house responsibilities adjoin each other, a clearly defined node has been created. Constituents from different periods organize beautiful compares. This is clearly visible at the new glass entryway where a glass front has been placed in front of the original facade, creating a extended patio. The spaces in the aged facade have been replaced by open wooden formulates. An oak walkway spans the admittance expanse and patterns the connection between two build proportions. The astonishing round reception table features the Delfland Water Authority logo.

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Water mapsThe graphics on the glass walls of the conference of the parties center were designed by Silo and inspired by the enormous capital of antique liquid planneds belonging to the Water Authority. In cooperation with the Textielmuseum Tilburg, Silo also designed a tapestry, made of millions of water droplets. It is the eye-catcher of the central hall.

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Meeting gardenThe parking lot at Phoenixstraat has been transformed into an handsome square that leads to the entering. The existing yellowish pavers are laid in the original structure, from which the round wind rose emerges beautifully. Behind the square is a converge plot where something is to be experienced during all seasons. The garden likewise acts as a sea buffer. Vegetation is planted in a playful geometric decoration, intersected by stepping moves. Now and there, private squares have been created where one can sit in the park. Where once was a busy loading and unloading neighbourhood , now lays a welcome oasis of peace.

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

Courtesy of Mecanoo architecten

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AstraZeneca set to replace Skanska on delayed £500m HQ

Pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca is understood to be in talks to oust Skanska on its delayed flagship HQ project in Cambridge.

Costs have skyrocketed beyond PS500m on the gigantic assignment, which now gapes set to be completed nearly two years late.

Striking HQ saw-tooth roof, which carries on through to the facade, has presented challenges

Both AstraZeneca and Skanska refused to comment on the situation.

But rumors are rampant that Mace could now be in announced in to finish development projects at the Cambridge Biomedical Campus.

The complex was initially due to be finished in the third quarter of 2017. Now the project is timetabled to finished in May next year.

But beginnings claim this second given deadline may not be met with the pharma whale now looking at a phased tenancy of the building for its near 2,500 staff.

Last year the Enquirer discovered the expected cost of the headquarters and R& D composite had surged from PS330m to over PS500m.

A source said:” It seems the project is facing postponements of approximately two years, is a result of ocean ingress into the vault because of the high water table involving a good deal of remedial work.

” There have been previously been issues with motif and roof loadings.

” There is a general shock that after over two years the building still presents as a husk and core project with very few assistances, containment, switchgear or cabling installed .”

Skanska is understood to be working on a cost-plus basis and has been hurling assets at the site, including senior managers from its neighbouring Papworth Hospital project as this scales down.

Earlier this year Skanska applied to the local congres to give wielding duration on the project by 25 hours a week, ramping up permitted working inside the building from 7am to 8p m on weekdays and 7am- 8p m on weekends.

This application accused the overheated structure market and the inability to gain enough contractors to enable the construction timetable to be met.

The project management switch comes at a torrid period for Skanska, which announced PS33m of writedowns last year and delivered a curve of job slice at its UK headquarters in Maple Cross.

Skanska’s retarded AstraZeneca and Papworth hospital campaigns set next to each other at the Cambridge Biomedical Campus

In June, Skanska suffered another major disappointment on its neighbouring PS165m Papworth hospital project at the Cambridge Biomedical Campus after combustible cladding was known shaped to the building.

This project was expected to open in September but will be delayed for several months while the substandard investing is replaced.

If Mace is demonstrated as the new activity precede at the AstraZeneca job, it would be the second time in a year that the house has stepped in to take over a Skanska contract.

Mace also supplanted Skanska on the PS1bn+ Phase Two contract at the Battersea Power Station redevelopment in London after the customers reviewed its contract approach on the project to construction management to control costs more tightly.

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Hexalace / Studio Ardete


© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

Architects: Studio Ardete
Location: Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar, Mohali, Punjab, India
Project Year: 2018
Photographs: Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

Project Management: R.S Builders
Façade Consultant: Er.Ravijeet Singh
Structural Consultant: Continental Foundation (Vikas Bhardwaj)
Lighting Consultant: The Luminars (Tajender Kalsi)
Plot Area: 9061.0 ft2
Built Up Area: 5481.0 ft2
Facade Area: 3234.0 ft2


© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

Text description provided by the architects. Hexalace is an open-plan commercial building made primarily for leasing purposes. In a tight commercial plot with challenging building norms, it became perceptible from the beginning that the concept would have to be manifested from the facade. Considering the arduous climatic conditions involving extreme heat, and the building front facing west, the façade emerged as a buffer of stratifying elements.


© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

3 inches thick concrete layer with hexagonal interstices has been used as a shading element. To better preserve the sanctity of shade, the screen flows organically creating an artistic visual dilemma from both inside as well as outside. Another layer of hexagonal silhouette made of metal frames is superimposed horizontally across the semi-permeable concrete screen which doubles up as balcony fence.


Sketch graphic

Sketch graphic

Furthermore, the main curtain wall has been recessed to leave pockets of air between the screen and the main building to increase the time lag and subsequently reduce the heat gain. Therefore, the facade by its inherent virtue of convergence acts as bronchioles for the structure.


© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

The balconies also house small clusters of green making the working environment even more rejuvenating for the users within. By the end, what became of an immense effort was an imperative respiratory experience complimented by its bold use of geometry.


© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

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New Sancho de Avila’s Funeral Home / JFA – Estudio de Arquitectura


© Adrià Goula

© Adrià Goula

Architects: JFA – Estudio de Arquitectura
Location: Carrer dels Almogàvers, 93, 08018 Barcelona, Spain
Architects In Charge: Jordi Frontons, Xavi Durán, Pau Frontons
Area: 10250.0 m2
Project Year: 2018
Photography: Adrià Goula, Courtesy of JFA – Estudio de Arquitectura

Technical Architect: Didac Freixa
Project Management: Edetco Tècnics
Structure: JFG Consultors- Joan Francesc García
Facilities: Proisotec Enginyeria
Construction Companies: Culleré i Sala, MCM Obras, García Faura, MGIntegral, Dominion
Promoter: Grupo Mémora – Serveis Funeraris de Barcelona


© Adrià Goula

© Adrià Goula

Text description provided by the architects. The project houses the “New Sancho de Avila’s Funeral Home” (“Tanatorio de Sancho de Ávila”) in Barcelona. It is located in the same block as the ‘same-name’ original building. The original Funeral Home opened in 1968, and was the first existing funeral home which introduced, in Spain, the concept of wake outside the family home, thus representing a change in the way of vigil the dead. 50 years after the construction of the original building, the challenge was to design a building which became a new funeral home model adapted to the present and future needs of the sector and become a benchmark for the city.


© Adrià Goula

© Adrià Goula

The location of the building has specific constraints: there are the former basements, which must be conserved; and it is marked by the presence of the train line, which crosses the plot in the transverse direction and which is covered by a protection slab. The slab raises the “use mark”. Furthermore, in the front giving on Zamora street, there is a public parking, below ground, which gives service to the new building. The proposed intervention creates two different volumes, which accommodate the different services of the complex and are articulated according to the city plan, and creates a public inner square which becomes the principal backbone of the project. 


© Adrià Goula

© Adrià Goula


Lower Plan

Lower Plan


© Adrià Goula

© Adrià Goula

This public space generated within the plot,  absorbs the two volumes, connecting them and generating a program beyond the internal use. It consists of a new city park, which integrates well the buildings, it manages the flows, and it frames the complex into the urban landscape. The new inner square of the Funeral Home is raised 1.5 meters from the street level, due to the preexisting elements. Taking full advantage of this morphology, a unifying element is raised, which functions as an stereotomic podium, which raises the new building, all which creates the required privacy and settles the new volumetric in a new horizon. 

Each of the buildings are raised as a mixture of volumes, which keeps a common compositional line but they are different regarding materialization: horizontal designs clearly predominate in the Funeral home building, which closes to the street, providing the privacy required in its use, and opens to the public space, being this an exercise of reclusion and privacy.  On the other hand, the Services building is much more permeable, and opens to the street, the neighborhood, the city,… in an exercise of transparency and as a lure. This building is wrapped with a second skin, which improves the climatic environment, due to the sun exposure of the spans and a visual control between buildings in the inner front of the square.


© Adrià Goula

© Adrià Goula

Each of the buildings are raised as a mixture of volumes, which keeps a common compositional line but they are different regarding materialization: horizontal designs clearly predominate in the Funeral home building, which closes to the street, providing the privacy required in its use, and opens to the public space, being this an exercise of reclusion and privacy.  On the other hand, the Services building is much more permeable, and opens to the street, the neighborhood, the city,… in an exercise of transparency and as a lure.


© Adrià Goula

© Adrià Goula

This building is wrapped with a second skin, which improves the climatic environment, due to the sun exposure of the spans and a visual control between buildings in the inner front of the square.


© Adrià Goula

© Adrià Goula

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UTS Blackfriars Children’s Centre / DJRD + Lacoste + Stevenson


© Brett Boardman

© Brett Boardman

Architects: DJRD, Lacoste + Stevenson
Location: Blackfriars St, Chippendale NSW 2008, Australia
Architects Team: Thierry Lacoste, David Stevenson, Daniel Beekwilder, Tasmin Dunn, Edward Dieppe, Arash Engineer, Jessica Santos
Area: 1650.0 m2
Project Year: 2018
Photographs: Brett Boardman

Services Engineers: Umow Lai
Structural + Civil Engineering: Henry & Hymas
Landscape Design: Ric McConaghy
Heritage Architect: Paul Davies
Acoustic Consultant: Acoustic Logic
Project Management: Angie Clements, UTS FMO
Builder: Ichor Constructions
New Building Area: 760 m2
Refurbished Building Area: 240 m2
Playground Landscaping Area (Includes Verandahs): 650 m2
Site Area: 2080 m2
Client: University of Technology Sydney


© Brett Boardman

© Brett Boardman

Text description provided by the architects. The new Blackfriars Children’s Centre is a childcare center in Sydney by DJRD and Lacoste + Stevenson, architects in association. The building celebrates the beautifully naive depictions of housing by children. Each playroom in the Centre is in the form of a house as might be drawn by a child; a box with a pitched roof.  A sense of home in both scale and materiality creates the feeling of a familiar place.


© Brett Boardman

© Brett Boardman


Floor Plan

Floor Plan


© Brett Boardman

© Brett Boardman

The overall form is a series of small ‘houses’ continuously connected along the street, each varying slightly in pitch and scale to create an animated streetscape of pitched roofs.  The profile of pitched roofs provides a prominent presence for the Centre along Blackfriars Street. The materials used evoke warmth, welcome and transparency.  The external façade is a combination of clear glass and glass with a graphic, and painted vertical timber paneling with the gable roof ends clad in a translucent sheet that is illuminated from within. 


© Brett Boardman

© Brett Boardman

Colorful timber slats partially screen the internal ‘street’ from the public footpath.  Large-format, historic photographs of past events of Blackfriars School connects the new center to the site. The footprint of the building has been designed to respond to and complete the courtyard formed by the heritage buildings.  Engagement between the new and old architecture is achieved with the dimpled mirror polished panels which clad the façades facing the heritage buildings. The effect is a playful dialogue of reflections between the new building and the heritage site.


© Brett Boardman

© Brett Boardman

Once inside the rooms are connected by an undulating plywood sensory wall.  The procession through to the playrooms is more than just circulation; it connects the internal spaces in a way that incorporates wonderful moments for children to learn and interact in spontaneous ways. The internal rooms are also lined with vertical timber paneling painted white.  The playrooms make use of ‘thickened’ walls for storage, cubby spaces and reading nooks. 


© Brett Boardman

© Brett Boardman

Timber floors and plywood walls and furniture create warmth within the rooms.  The use of rugs and fabric upholstery throughout the center also add softness to spaces and assist other acoustic treatments to ensure active spaces are still acoustically comfortable. Each playroom opens onto an outdoor play area ensuring indoor and outdoor spaces are seamlessly connected creating variety for the children and teachers to adapt to the day and to different activities.


© Brett Boardman

© Brett Boardman

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Archimède / Brenac & Gonzalez & Associés


© Sergio Grazia

© Sergio Grazia

Architects: Brenac & Gonzalez & Associés
Location: Rue Gerty Archimède, 75012 Paris, France
Landscape Architecture: Babylone
Artistic Intervention: Visual System
Area: 16000.0 m2
Project Year: 2017
Photographs: Sergio Grazia

Construction Project Management: Builders & Partners
Services Engineer: THOR
Acoustican: CAPRI Acoustique
Structural Engineering: SCYNA 4
Façade Engineering: VSA
Inspection: BTP Consultant
Enviromental Quality Consultant: THOR
Client: OGIC
Programme: Commercial office building + sports facility
Eco Design: Offices – HQE – Exceptional Rating + BREEAM Very Good, Gymnasium – HQE Excellent Rating


© Sergio Grazia

© Sergio Grazia

Text description provided by the architects. The Archimède project is located in the Bercy neighborhood, a district undergoing redevelopment that runs along railways leading to the Gare de Lyon.


© Sergio Grazia

© Sergio Grazia


Sections

Sections


© Sergio Grazia

© Sergio Grazia

The strategy conceived for the project envisaged greater density along the railway that required only a section of the lot made available. The choice of a compact volume liberates the ground level and provides the neighbouring school and surrounding area with an unexpected green space, proof that density is not the enemy of open space.


© Sergio Grazia

© Sergio Grazia


Details 2

Details 2


© Sergio Grazia

© Sergio Grazia

The volumes were developed through a process of adjustment to the urban context rather than a formalist or aesthetic approach, and the treatment of each façade derives directly from its orientation. Those most exposed to sunlight benefit from a crystalline double skin of vertically pleated printed glass slats which protect the bay windows. To the north, faceted metallic cladding reproduces the radiance and reflections of the glass and wraps the character of changeability and immateriality around the building.


© Sergio Grazia

© Sergio Grazia


Elevations

Elevations


© Sergio Grazia

© Sergio Grazia

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