The Ultimate Guide to Telecommuting

Remote laborers. Mobile professionals. Digital nomads. Road warriors. Call them what you will, but telecommuters are driving the future of work.

Telecommuting was once shrugged off as another veer for choosy millennials. Now, it’s an accepted approaching to how “were working”( and live) and chances for hiring management to assigned a global web. The World Economic Forum calls it “one of the most difficult operators of alteration” in the workforce.

But some supervisors still aren’t sure whether the government has take the plunge, worried that allowing employees to work from home means they’ll never wreak. As it happens, the opposite is true.

If you’re strange about why so many people are exiting virtual or how it could benefit your business, this is the guidebook for you. Let’s explore how countries around the world of remote piece projects and what you’ll need to get started.

Telecommuting Stats for 2018

According to Global Workplace Analytics, telecommuting has grown by 115% since 2005. That’s nearly 10 terms faster than the rest of the workforce. GWA’s research likewise shows 😛 TAGEND

80% to 90% of people say they’d is ready to telework at least the members of the week.

36% would choose telework over a fee cause, and 37% would take a wage trimmed.

For 95% of companies, telework increases hire retention.

6 in ten employers enjoy significant cost savings.

And that’s exclusively the beginning. A study by the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Hope noted 74% of employers now furnish the option to telecommute. Gallup learnt that employees feel most participated at work when off-site three or four epoches a few weeks. And participants of a UK-based survey consider traditional commuting is likely to be unheard of by 2036.

Wondering why you haven’t caught on hitherto? Don’t worry. Before you make stakeholders with the numbers, be decided whether telecommuting really is the best move.

What Types of Companies Offer Telecommuting?

Impressive though it resounds, telecommuting isn’t a catch-all answer. Undertakings that require face-to-face contact, equipment touch, or some sort of physical presence don’t give themselves well to remote environments.

As a rule of thumb, remote-friendly wreak falls into two categories: It’s online, and/ or it’s independent. Telecommuting designs particularly well for business in the following industries 😛 TAGEND

Marketings and market

Customer work

Healthcare

Computer and new technologies

Education and training

Administration

Telecommuting companies of all sizes report multimillion-dollar cost savings from rug telework planneds. Of track, some personas translate to virtual contexts better than others. Most firms evaluate qualification on a case-by-case basis, according to the candidate’s chore requirements, past conduct, and time in the role.

What about hiring remote craftsmen? You have a few alternatives. Remote-specific undertaking boards like FlexJobs, Remote.co, We Work Remotely, Remote OK, and Jobspresso target( but can’t pledge) people with remote know-how. You could also post the number of jobs on LinkedIn, Certainly, or your job search engine of alternative, performing it clear that remote is an option.

The Pros and Cons of Telecommuting

Telecommuting advantages both employers and employees, but it isn’t without its detriments. Let’s compare both sides.

For Your Business

The better telecommuters are rare humen. Not everyone can self-regulate and communicate effectively from anywhere.

On the plus surface, you’re saving position opening, which intends there’s no need to worry about your company’s potential growth. And here’s the interesting part: Office space for the average proletarian expenses about $11,000 per year. Restriction manpower abbreviates major overhead while doing the environment a solid. Even better, you increase work happiness and retention, which leads us to the pros and cons.

For Employees

Developing the self-motivation and self-restraint are essential to work from dwelling is arguably more challenging than learning it. Some remote proletarians also report feeling lonely or directionless.

But if done right, telecommuting derives large-hearted wages. While saving epoch, coin, and countries around the world, most telecommuters find that working from residence( or coffee shop, or room in the lumbers) composes a work-life offset, a distraction- and stress-free environment, and a larger feel of limitation over their work.

Together, these benefits make for joyful works. And joyful employees are usually immense employees. An huge 91% of remote craftsmen feel more productive working at home. So, the most remote craftsmen, the bigger the dent in the trillions of dollars U.S. corporations lose to productivity matters each year and the greater your workforce retention. It’s a no-brainer, right?

For Both Employer and Employee

Well , not quite. It’s important that your candidate’s priorities align with your own.

For example, is in-person collaboration more important to your firm than forming room for future proliferation? Perhaps it’s not the right time for your employees to telecommute more. Nonetheless, you might be willing to invest in tech that utters remote team-building much smoother( more on that afterward ).

Consider what you’re willing to trade off. Then, find a compromise.

With that footing place, you’re ready to set formal boundaries.

Telecommuting Plan: Why Your Business Needs One

In any area of your business, meter or resource constraints can give policymaking on the back burner. The same is true-blue with telecommuting, especially on a informal or temporary basis. Though virtually two-thirds of business earmark telecommuting, fewer than half have formalized a policy.

So are they necessary? The short answer: Yes.

In a remote workforce, there’s greater potential for equivocal hopes. Miscommunication can quickly intensify without a policy in place. With one, you give clear purposes from the start.

How to Appoint a Telecommuting Policy

You won’t find a perfect give of constants for every business. Feel free to adjust according to legal requirements in your manufacture, and consult legal counsel. For “the worlds largest” segment, though, your telecommuting plan should cover the following 😛 TAGEND

Eligibility and acceptance

Flexibility

Equipment and cybersecurity

Workspace and locating

Communication

Dependent charge

For each rider, ask yourself a few important questions 😛 TAGEND Eligibility and Approval

Do you need a formal process for vetting and approving remote works? Are you looking for specific stances or employ morals in your applicants( like strong communication or responsiveness )? Should they go through directors or higher up the chain of command?

Flexibility

How numerous days per week can employees telecommute, if not full duration? Does it depend on seniority or other factors? Should your employees be reachable during core business hours? Or do they have the freedom to choose as they get the job done?

Rig and Cybersecurity

Will you stipulate your remote laborers with any paraphernalium( such as computers, phones, desks, or office supplies )? Who owns and maintains it? Are passwords enough to protect your corporate data, or do you need encryption and GPS tracking? Should hires shun unsecured coffee-shop wifi?

Workspace and Location

Should your employee work in a dedicated bureau gap? Should that be assured, too? Is it safe? Check with your legal team, but you may be liable for harms within work hours. As for spot, should telecommuters stay within one particular radius or are you restricted by country or district?

Communication

What are the best ways for employees to contact you? Will you designate regular check-in asks? Perhaps less-frequent( monthly or quarterly) on-site requirements? How are you able impel yourself and your remote worker’s squad as affable as possible?

Dependent Care

Whether it concerns the kids or the dog, telecommuting is not a substitute for dependent caution. You can and should make exceptions for sick family members, but employees need to designing the following schedule for dedicated work.

Expect campaigners to make a example for their individual needs, but try stick to the same rules for everyone. Consistency trumps the favoritism card.

That said, you may need to update your programme as you learn what’s operate and what’s not.

Best Practices for Remote Team Management

Now that we’ve encompassed the pros, cons, policies, and what other telecommuting companies are doing, we’ll wrap up with four best rehearsals for managing the remote team of dreams.

1. Use a communication platform.

Virtual communication doesn’t have to be a roadblock. Often better proposed, phone- and web-based conventions cut through water-cooler clatter and impromptu fulfills to get circumstances done.

Try a video and audio conferencing tools like Zoom, Skype for Business, or Slack. And not just to participate. Get artistic with ways to build trust and ties-in in your squad, like sharing nonsensical position photos or setting up dedicated “fun” chats.

2. Head to the gloom.

It’s easy to lose track of projects within a dispersed squad. Make advantage of cloud-based file hosting providers like Dropbox and Google Drive to sync and collect work online. Trello, Basecamp, or one of these project management tools are also welcome to stop everyone organized and trail productivity.

3. Don’t be a stranger.

You don’t want to micromanage works, but you do want to be available and caring, track advancement, and keep them in the loop. How about regular coaching? A weekly one-to-one should do it. A quarterly meet-up or yearly off-site vanishes the additional mile in building remote laborers feel part of the team.

4. Celebrate success.

Technically, feedback is part of coaching. But it’s more important and easier to forget when working remotely, it is therefore deserves its own recognise here.

To create a great feedback culture 😛 TAGEND

Involve the part unit.

Get face hour when probable to deliver productive assessment the direction it’s proposed.

When your employee does a good job, make them know!

It may sound self-evident, but some overseers don’t recognise they’ve left remote employees hanging — or the negative effects. Positive( and detailed) feedback improves amazing team spirit.

Best Practices for Remote Team Management

Now that we’ve encompassed the pros, cons, programmes, and what other telecommuting corporations are doing, we’ll wrap up with four best rehearsals for managing the remote crew of dreams.

1. Use a communication platform.

Virtual communication doesn’t have to be a roadblock. Often better projected, phone- and web-based consultations cut through water-cooler tattle and impromptu joins to get events done.

Try a video and audio conferencing tools like Zoom, Skype for Business, or Slack. And not only to collaborate. Get inventive with ways to build confidence and ties-in in your unit, like sharing wacky part photos or setting up dedicated “fun” chats.

2. Head to the cloud.

It’s easy to lose track of projects within a dispersed team. Take advantage of cloud-based datum hosting providers like Dropbox and Google Drive to sync and place work online. Trello, Basecamp, or one of these project management tools are also welcome to save everyone organised and trail productivity.

3. Don’t be a stranger.

You don’t want to micromanage employees, but you do want to be available and supportive, track progression, and keep them in the loop. How about regular coaching? A weekly one-to-one should do it. A quarterly meet-up or yearly off-site leads the extra mile in attaining remote proletarians feel part of the team.

4. Celebrate success.

Technically, feedback is part of coaching. But it’s more important and easier to forget when working remotely, so it deserves its own recognize here.

To create a great feedback culture 😛 TAGEND

Involve the part crew.

Get face era when possible to extradite productive assessment the mode it’s aimed.

When your employee does a great job, cause them know!

It know it sounds self-evident, but some boss don’t recognize they’ve left remote proletarians hanging — or the negative effects. Positive( and detailed) feedback constructs amazing team spirit. Conclusion

Not fully on board hitherto? Here’s your biggest takeaway: Measure and tweak as you learn what works for you and your workforce. Start small with a handful of works, criterion productivity and roll out a greater telecommuting formation if all goes well.

But if you’re sold, go for it! Considering the positive impact on the business and its people, telework is worth considering before your adversaries do.

Read more about this at: blog.hubspot.com

Queensland Jobs Available (Updated as of 18 August)

Looking for Work in Queensland?

Welcome to the available Jobs Section — our pick of the most relevant and flexible Queensland jobs for mums like you!  All the jobs are mum friendly, updated daily and are current (as far as we know!).

via queenslandbrides.com.au

Work from Home Business Opportunity

 Are you sick of juggling work, life, children, social engagements etc?
Do you want more freedom to spend time doing the things you love?
One of the great things about this business is it does NOT involve cold calling, NO harassing friends & family, NO stocking products, NO paying rent for commercial space, NO MLM, NO home parties, NO one-on-one presentations.
If you have 15 hours a week spare to put into a new venture, and are driven to make a change in your like, I would love to hear from you.

Click here for further information!

Condition: Full time/Part time, at least 15 hours a week
Full training provided*
Job available until July 12, 2019

Boarding House Cleaner

Location:  Warwick QLD
Conditions: Part Time
Job available until: Not specified

To apply please click here

Senior Associate

Location: Brisbane
Conditions: Full time
Job available until: Not specified

To apply please click here

Real Estate Salesperson

Location: Gold Coast
Conditions: Full Time
Job available until: August 25

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!

Client Support Officer

Location: Northern QLD
Job available until: August 25

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!

Digital Photo Editor / Photoshop

Location: Gold Coast
Salary: $20 – $29.99 per hour
Conditions: Casual
Job available until: August 25

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!

Senior Procurement and Contracts Officer

Location: Brisbane
Conditions: Full Time
Job available until: August 22

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!

Clinical Nurse

Location: Brisbane
Conditions: Full Time
Job available until: August 26

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!

Inventory and Stockroom Controller

Location: Gold Coast
Conditions: Full Time
Job available until: August 26

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!

Retail Assistant

Location: Sunshine Coast
Conditions: Part Time
Job available until: August 16

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!

Coordinator

Location: Northern QLD
Conditions: Full Time
Job available until: August 24

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!

 

Purchasing Officer

Location: Northern QLD
Conditions: Part Time
Job available until: August 24

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!

 

Admin/Accounts Assistant

Location:Brisbane
Conditions: Part Time
Job available until: August 24

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!

Looking for work in other states? Check out other job boards HERE

If you have a job to add, please email us at info@stayathomemum.com.au.

Read more about this at: stayathomemum.com.au

Latest Cruise Jobs: August 12

Published in: Cruise News

Job Listings

A look at recent key job opportunities around the cruise ship industry:

Latest Key Jobs:

Employer
Job Title
Location

Norwegian Cruise
Outbound Sales Consultant Hiring Event
Miami

Norwegian Cruise
Travel Influencer – Port Shopping Luxury Ambassador
Miami

Royal Caribbean
Amara at Paraiso Job Fair!
Miami

Royal Caribbean
Part Time Sales Associate Women’s Apparel
Miami

Princess Cruises
Direct Sales Specialist
California

Princess Cruises
AWS System Administrator/ Technical Support/Project Management
California

Holland America Line    
Stability Manager
Seattle

Holland America Line    
Cruise Consultant (Work from Home)
Seattle

Holland America Line    
Sr Employee Relations Specialist
Seattle

Carnival UK  
Chef De Partie – Fleet – Ship Based
UK

Carnival UK
Food and Beverage Services Manager – Fleet – Ship Based
UK

More cruise line jobs are available here.

Read more about this at: cruiseindustrynews.com

How to Write a Compelling Customer Success Job Posting

In the growing field of customer success, it can be difficult to find the right people for the job, especially because some of them don’t even know that the job exists yet. This blog will teach you how to write an effective customer success job posting that will give you a pool of stellar candidates.

You’ll learn what content to include, why, and how to structure it so applicants know exactly what you’re looking for in your customer success position. But, before posting your open positions on every cork board—electronic or otherwise—you need to first define a specific role.

Defining A Specific Role

The customer success industry is becoming more and more mature and complex, so not all positions will be the same. Different roles will all have increasingly different responsibilities. Top applicants who are aware of this change will notice when a company has a broad, unspecific idea of a customer success role in their job description. Applicants will assume the company isn’t truly customer-centric and hasn’t defined the department well enough.

When your role is clear and specific, your job posting will reflect that. Thus, we recommend you start from the description of an ideal candidate and widdle down to the job posting itself. This way the job posting will be an accurate representation of the role and applicants meeting the requirements will know right away!

When you work the other way around, you end up focusing more on making a job posting that attracts the largest number of applicants instead of the most qualified ones. This can backfire on you if your applicants don’t end up being exactly what you’re looking for, or if applicants realize during their interview that the job isn’t what the description said it would be.

Think about what you want in an ideal candidate. Customer success managers can be of many kinds of backgrounds, but they should all have certain traits, such as being empathetic, proactive, a great communicator, and strategic.

You can also consider the following questions when curating your ideal candidate:

How do you want the candidate to work with your team?
What company values should they reflect?
What kind of goals (short- and long-term) do you want the candidate to achieve in this position?
What kind of past experiences would best help them achieve these goals?
What other tasks and projects will the candidate work on?
Will they work with other teams outside of Customer Success? Why and how?
What are special experiences that would put this candidate above the rest?
Are there benefits for this candidate related to work performance?

Do you have the answers to these questions? Do you know exactly what kind of person should fill your missing role? Well, go on then. Go write that ideal role description! Don’t worry, we’ll wait.

Writing A Job Description

Now that you have a description for your ideal candidate, you can use that information to fill in your job description.

Here are the sections we’re using, but don’t be afraid to change this up to suit your needs:

Position title
Introducing the position
Introducing the company
Purpose of the position
Responsibilities of the position
Experience and background
Bonus qualifications
Compensation and benefits

Position title

The position title is the first impression you make on applicants, whether it’s on the job posting itself or in a link that someone shared. It has to be specific and interesting enough for someone to want to continue reading.

Just because Customer Success is a new industry, doesn’t mean it’s a one size fits all situation. Don’t post a title as “Customer Success Manager” if you’re actually looking for someone in customer marketing.

Be wary of using vague words, such as “associate” and “specialist”, and monikers, like “magician” and “guru”, in your title. The former may tell applicants that you don’t really know the difference between the various customer success roles. The latter may be a way to display your company culture, but such monikers can also come off click-baity and dissuade applicants who see this as unprofessional job titles.

Compromise: You can use a fun title but put a clearer, more professional one in parenthesis, suggests Paul Wolfe, Senior Vice President of HR at Indeed.com.

Introducing the position

Here, applicants have read your job title and are thinking, “Hey, this might be for me,” so your next couple sentences have to keep them on the hook. This is a great place to highlight what you’re looking for in an ideal candidate. For example:

Amity is looking for a Customer Success Manager who likes helping others, building relationships, wants to be an advocate for customers, and will be an innovative team player.

By beginning the job description with your desired qualities, you can ensure applicants who identify with your company values are going forward.

Introducing the company

For applicants who don’t already know your company, this is where you can give them a short but firm handshake with words. Show them why you’re the place for them (or maybe not!) using a few sentences. Tell applicants why they should want to work at your company. What kind of person will be a good fit with your culture? For example:

Amity is a fast-growing customer success company that loves collaboration and teamwork throughout the organization. Our ideal candidate has experience in customer success, customer service, or a related idea. He/she is a fast learner and will work with Sales, Marketing, and Engineering to improve customer relations. The candidate will gain skills in project management and inter-departmental collaboration.

Don’t saturate the introduction, or the overall job description, with promotions for your company and why it’s the best place to work—that’s not the purpose of this job description.

Make the content about the position, i.e. what applicants can bring to your company and how you can help them grow, in turn.

Keep this section brief so people aren’t reading multiple paragraphs about the company and a vague description of the job before finally getting into the details.

Purpose of the position

This is a quick summary of what the ideal candidate will do in terms of goals. This is where those short- and long-term goals you came up with for the role description will come in handy. These goals can be for the role itself or the CS team as a whole. For example:

Purpose of the position:

To increase customer loyalty within the existing customer base.
To help the CS team reduce churn by 10% within the next two quarters.

Having metrics in this section is a plus because it tells applicants you have measurable (and hopefully attainable) goals in mind for them.

The list, also, doesn’t have to be long. Quality over quantity is really important here. You don’t want to overwhelm applicants with all the goals they need to achieve before they’ve even applied!

Responsibilities of the position

The responsibilities entail how the ideal candidate will work with the rest of the company to achieve the purpose of the position. Are there specific teams they’ll need to work with, like Marketing or Engineering, to accomplish projects?

Present a list of short bullet points with the goals and projects the candidate will work on, so applicants know what to expect. They’ll see if these are tasks that they’ve done before, ones that they want to gain experience in, or ones that they aren’t interested in.

You can also include what they won’t be responsible for, so applicants know exactly what they’re getting themselves into. For example:

Responsibilities:

Work with developers to improve the product based on customer needs; but not responsible for customer support and ticket management.
Help the Chief Customer Officer to create a churn reduction plan.

Telling applicants what other teams they’ll work with is a strong indicator for those who are looking for a specific type of CS position, like one that works with developers and not just Sales. This is also useful for applicants to avoid companies who just rebranded support or account management as customer success.

You can include who the candidate will be reporting to, as well, if you know that information at this stage. If you have a full-fledged CS team, it makes sense for your new hire to report to the VP of Customer Success (or a related executive). However, with newer customer success teams, this can be grey area. Should the CSM report to the VP of Sales, the CEO, or someone else? This is something that will come up in the interview, so it may help to be upfront and put this in the job posting.

The number of bullets in this section is up to your discretion. Remember, this isn’t meant to be an exhaustive list of every little thing the candidate will do. Be practical and narrow down the job to describe specific priorities that applicants should be aware of.

Experience and background

You’ve told the applicants about their future in this position, but now, you need to know about their past. The qualifications and prior experience necessary to achieve the goals you mentioned in the purpose will be here, including history in your industry. For example:

Skills and experience we’re looking for:

Post-Secondary degree or certificate in a business-related field (e.g. Marketing, Sales, Communications).
2+ years B2B customer success or related field (e.g. customer marketing, customer service).
Loves taking initiative and helping others.
Exceptional attention to detail and multi-tasking skills.

This isn’t just a certification section. It’s also for soft-skills, i.e. the qualities that you learn from on-the-job experience, not a textbook. Again, this doesn’t need to be a grocery list of items, but you should mention those top 4-8 things you just need to have in a good candidate.

Bonus qualifications

Remember when we said to write the description of your ideal candidate? Well this is where you get to put all those little things that make an A-level candidate an A+ one. What are the experiences and qualifications that aren’t necessary but desired by your team and company? For example:

Bonus qualifications (these aren’t necessary but will put you at the top of our list!):

Experience working in SaaS companies (specifically CS software is another plus!).
Management experience and leading team-oriented projects.
Portfolio of improvements you made in your last Customer Success team. We love metrics!

This list should not be as long as your preferred experience section! On that note, if you decide to include this section in your job posting, we recommend you have about half as many bullets as you had in the prior section. You don’t want applicants to feel like you’re looking for an unrealistic candidate, or that it’ll be next to impossible for them to get an interview.

Compensation and benefits

Compensation and benefits go beyond just salary. Applicants want to know how you plan to measure their success. How will you track your new hire’s progress? What kind of metrics do you use? This biggest question is, are these metrics going to affect the new hire’s salary?

You may have to take a step back here and consider if there will be commissions and/or bonuses based on revenue. Be clear about this as some may prefer such salaries.

Posting Your Customer Success Job

That’s it, you’re done writing! But don’t jump the gun and publish your job posting just yet. With any piece of writing, it’s always best to get another pair of eyes to make sure everything is copacetic.

Once you’re ready to publish, get the word out by asking colleagues to share it within their professional circles, like on LinkedIn.

Copacetic gif from "Shes All That"

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Uber EMEA Headquarters / Assembly Design Studio + Cannon Design


© Jasper Sanidad

© Jasper Sanidad

Architects: Assembly Design Studio, Cannon Design
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Architect Of Record: Tetris Design and Build
Design Team: Liz Guerrero, Denise Cherry, Michelle Richter, Megan Sveiven, David Hunter, Courtney DeWalt, Jeorge Jordan, Sarah Dziuba, Colleen Masusako, Dion Dekker
Area: 8300.0 m2
Project Year: 2017
Photographs: Jasper Sanidad

Project Management: JLL
General Contractor: Tetris Design and Build
Mep Consultant: Smits van Burgst
Structural Engineer: Zonnefeld Ingenieurs
Lighting Consultant: Smits van Burgst
Millwork: Harmeling Interieurconcepten
Consultant: Hospitality Group
Leed Consultant: BREEAM Consultant/ DGMR
Graphic Design: Assembly Design Studio
Furniture Dealer: Ahrend
Sub Contractor: InZee
Av Consultant: System Video
Stair Sub Contractor: AllStairs Graphic


© Jasper Sanidad

© Jasper Sanidad

Text description provided by the architects. With services offered in more than 65 countries and over 450 cities worldwide, Uber is one of the tech industry’s fastest global expansions. The key to Uber’s rapid globalization was to “think local to expand global”. In 2017, Uber moved and expanded their EMEA headquarters in Amsterdam to establish a global presence, connect people and cultures, and understand the ever-evolving markets around them.


© Jasper Sanidad

© Jasper Sanidad

As design lead on the project, Assembly Design Studio worked with Uber to create an international office in Amsterdam that celebrates and embraces the diversity and culture of their global community. While still incorporating Uber’s core values of grounded, populist, inspiring, highly evolved, and elevated, the EMEA headquarters reflects the pulse and influences of Amsterdam while highlighting different regions of Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. What emerged was a fusion of colors, materials, and patterns that perfectly expresses the notion of bringing people together.


© Jasper Sanidad

© Jasper Sanidad

The space is built around the concept of activity-based working. There are no assigned seats, instead employees are placed within team-based neighborhoods. Each neighborhood is multi-functional and akin to a small office. There is an opportunity to personalize, an opportunity to come together in a comfortable setting, and an opportunity to meet formally all within the open environment. Featured in every neighborhood is at least one “mantle,” a simple but warm way to allow each team to collectively personalize their space.


© Jasper Sanidad

© Jasper Sanidad

Woven throughout the space is a complex network of places to meet and work. Every style of collaboration is represented from casual lounge spaces to tucked away hubs overlooking the canals, from an espresso bar to a restaurant. The diversity of space doesn’t end with collaboration and meeting spaces. The designers sought to incorporate how each person transitions and works throughout the day, by creating different experiences and alternative types of postures while working from standing work top tables to semi-private nooks to walking paths.


© Jasper Sanidad

© Jasper Sanidad

Visible throughout the atrium is a central staircase that acts as a connective spine between all four floors. The green, concentric rings, inspired by Amsterdam’s canals, spiral upward and become a central gathering point at each floor landing. Clean lines, timeless materials, and local products are core to the Dutch design and bridges the surrounding neighborhoods and regions together.


© Jasper Sanidad

© Jasper Sanidad

The EMEA regions are expressed on each floor by richly, colored hues that also serve as a wayfinding guide. The palette for each was determined by the natural colors of its region – bright, rich blues of the Mediterranean; warm, inviting yellows of the Middle East; lush, vibrant greens of Western Europe. Every wall is moment of inspiration and is as rich as the backgrounds and diversity of the people who work here.


Floor Plan

Floor Plan

Uber wanted to establish a sense of community throughout their workspace by placing a restaurant on the ground floor, putting it front and center. The layout is open with a variety of seating arrangements, and the materials are reminiscent of the cobblestones and bricks lining the portals and retail shops along the streets of Amsterdam. “We wanted to make this space feel comfortable, where employees could come together. Uber’s culture at their EMEA headquarters is welcoming and has become a true melting pot. The teams see real value in taking a pause from their workday to come together over a meal, and we wanted to create a place to continue that tradition in their new space” says Liz Guerrero, Principal of Assembly.


© Jasper Sanidad

© Jasper Sanidad

Uber EMEA’s multi-cultural design story creates a crisp, fresh natural environment that allows every individual from any region feel represented, comfortable, and welcomed. Based around an activity-based work environment with choice of meeting spaces, both formal and informal, tucked away nooks, espresso bar and restaurant, lounge areas, adaptable work postures—the modern, local work environment is transformed within a global context.


© Jasper Sanidad

© Jasper Sanidad

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Re-Humanising Work and Organizations Through Projects by Antonio Nieto-Rodriguez

“The purpose of an organization is to enable ordinary human beings to do extraordinary things”, Peter Drucker

Work has always been considered an essential part of being human: a means of providing for food, clothes, and shelter. In the wake of the social turmoil and rising unemployment which led to the February Revolution of 1848 in France, the French socialist leader Louis Blanc argued that human beings have “the right to work”, or engage in productive employment, and may not be prevented from doing so.

The right to work was later safeguarded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations General Assembly and recognized in international human rights law through its inclusion in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

But since the industrial revolution, workers have been progressively reduced to numbers, headcount, assets, fixed costs; and organizations have been driven primarily by targets and control systems. Significant innovations in management have mostly focused on doing the work faster and more cheaply.

We had to wait for Peter Drucker to put the human being central stage, with his famous identification of the “Knowledge Worker”. Employees were not just hands; they also had a brain.

Unfortunately, Drucker’s wise words were soon lost in the erroneous and destructive theories that centred the organizations’ purpose on increasing shareholder value. Productivity, efficiency gains, and short-termism would take pride of place for decades, mostly at the expense of employees and the human and social side of organizations.

The impact of globalization and technological advancements, with thousands of companies collapsing and millions of jobs vanishing in western economies, has caused an enormous loss of confidence in capitalism and western leaders. And according to Silicon Valley futurists, over the next 10 years, societies will experience more change than in the past two and a half centuries. More change, at a greater speed than ever!

Despite this daunting outlook, let me put forward one idea that can inspire us to remain positive and prompt us to action.

There is one model of productive collaboration, a method of work to generate value, that has remained constant over centuries, irrespective of organizational fashions. This universal method of working and organizing work is the project. Project-based work has been the engine that turned ideas into reality and generated the major accomplishments in our civilisation.

Behavioral and social sciences confirm that there are few ways of working and collaborating more motivating and inspiring than being part of a project with an ambitious goal, a higher purpose, and a clear fixed deadline.

But the project is not only the most human-centric and value-creating vehicle for human effort; even more important, it is also resilient to robots, artificial intelligence and many of the technological “advances” that seem to aim at eradicating the right to work.

Yet, very few individuals have been trained to define and manage projects successfully.

The Project Revolution

According to my latest research (see chart), fewer management resources are being consumed by straight-ahead operations year by year. At the same time, and almost as communicating vessels, the number of projects run in organizations, together with the budgets and resources dedicated to them, have steadily increased.

Disruptive technologies will accelerate this trend. Robots and AI will take over much of the operational work, where they have not done so already. Organizations will shift their focus to projects and project-based work – leading to what I have called the “Project Revolution”. In this new landscape, projects are becoming the essential model for delivering change and creating value. We are witnessing the rise of the “project economy”. The so-called gig economy is driven by projects. This represents a massive disruption that is not only impacting the way organizations are managed. In fact, every aspect of our lives can be thought of as a set of projects. For example, a project-based approach is bringing much-needed new thinking to education, to careers, to corporate governance and in one or two bold cases even to democratic government itself.

We will all be project managers soon – and we must learn how to use the new rules to maximum effect.

Project-based work will increase the focus on Humans – Embrace it!

The good news is that project-based work is human-centric. Projects cannot be carried out by machines; they need humans to do the work and the thinking. The purpose of the project is the centre around which people and resources are assembled, bond, interact, plan the work and address emotional aspects to create a high-performing team. Technology will, of course, play a role in projects. It will improve the selection of projects and increase the chances of success. But technology will be an enabler, not the goal.

My plea is for society, organizations, leaders, politicians, and people to build the competencies required to transform and thrive in the new digital and project-driven economy. To learn how to set ambitious and inspiring goals; to establish clear deadlines and engage employees and citizens around a higher purpose. To establish a culture in which ideas are transformed into reality through projects. We should not be afraid of the future and the unknown. Let’s keep learning, and embrace project-based work.

 

About the author:

Antonio Nieto-Rodriguez (www.antonionietorodriguez.com) is a leading champion of Project Management and Strategy Implementation. He is the author of “The Focused Organization” (Taylor & Francis) and currently working on his next book, “The Project Revolution” (LID). Recognised by Thinkers50, Antonio is a visiting professor at Duke CE, Instituto de Empresa, Solvay, Vlerick, Ecole des Ponts, and Skolkovo.

This article is one in a series related to the 10th Global Peter Drucker Forum, with the theme management. the human dimension, taking place on November 29 & 30, 2018 in Vienna, Austria #GPDF18

Read more about this at: druckerforum.org